The Finer Things Club: How to Pair a Rosé with Cheese

I like wine. I like cheese. I do not like green eggs and ham. The last sentence is false, until proven to be true.

In the summer, having rosé is quintessential. It is a refreshing beverage for hot days spent outside, or at brunch in the city, or on your couch. How you say, pass the rosé now, sil vous plait?

There’s nothing better than having both rosé and cheese, however. This handy guide from Betches Love This is going to be printed out and put in my (parent’s) kitchen. Here is the link: Classy Cheese and Rose.

Here are three of my favorite rosés wines:

  1. Underwood Rosé:

It is dry, light, and has notes of cherry and oak. IDK about the cherry and oak part, but I really like this wine because it isn’t too sweet. Sometimes a rosé can come off as syrupy or overly sweet: that is not my preference, it may be yours. Underwood winery also sells their wines in cans, which is perfect for my mobile lifestyle. For picnics, drinking in parks without picnics, and drinking at home, sans picnic. The bottle sells for about $14, and one can costs $7.

underwood-cellars-rose-can_1

 

2. Whispering Angel Rosé

I discovered this rosé this summer, and it is delightful. The word “whispering” in the brand’s name rings true. With light floral notes, this wine is incredibly delicate on the palate (lol nice vocab, right?) and goes with practically anything. I like to drink this rosé when eating fish, chicken, or on its own. Typically, this bottle goes for $21, but some stores sell it for $16.

chateau-d-esclans-cotes-de-provence-whispering-angel-rose-provence-france-10153468

 

 

3. Côtes du Rousillon Rosé “Miraflors”

Another delightful, dry rosé! This bottle of Côtes du Rousillon goes for only $13. I think that it is a steal at that price, because it is one of my favorites. It seems like the perfect combination of dryness with a touch of berries, which is very subtly nuanced.

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